Rimini: The invasion of parasols

When I imagined the Italian town of Rimini I never thought of is as an endless sandy beach. But it really is that. A beach, that got infected by a very dangerous type of chicken-pox – the parasols. When you arrive you can’t actually see the beautiful blue sea, you can only see a forest of beach umbrellas of every color, shape and size imaginable spreading in every direction. Even if you go to google maps and look at Rimini you would see this:

Google map view of the Rimini beach

Google map view of the Rimini beach infected with parasols

It goes on like that for more that 15 kilometers, or in walking terms – forever. So a romantic stroll on the beach in the shallow water of the sea turned out to be like going on an moving walkway in the opposite direction. That was not so romantic so we had to try and beautify it with some alcohol. Although the endless beach was monotonous with its umbrellas there was a very positive side to it. We could always find our hotel easily because it was located near the small public beach that was about 20 meters wide. The public beach was the only place where there were no parasols.

The free public beach

The free public beach

Crowds

Crowds

Alcohol

Alcohol

Amazing art from recycled cans

Amazing art from recycled cans

But there is also another, prettier part of Rimini. Have you ever visited an Italian city without at least some ancient ruins? Neither have I and this definitely wasn’t going to be the first one. When you go behind all the colorful beach umbrellas you can see a city that was founded in the 3rd century BC. That was more that 2200 years ago.

The city center is a completely different story than the beach. It is a quiet ancient place with a lot to see and do and much less people. It looks like a little oasis for the locals. Paved with stone, not asphalt, and surrounded by older buildings, not hotels, this was a much more enjoyable place than the overcrowded seaside. With little restaurants on every square and small local shops it’s a great place to get lost and rest from the survival instinct you need when you are at the beach. We spent most of our evenings here, just wandering around.

Piazza Cavour

Piazza Cavour

Rimini old town

Rimini old town

Restaurants in the old town

Restaurants in the old town

Rimini old town

Rimini old town

The old part of Rimini is placed around the river Marecchia, that was called Ariminus in the ancient times. Originally Umbrian, then Etruscan, it the beginning of the 3rd century conquered by the Romans who established the colony of Ariminum here. On the main square, called Piazza Tre Martiti, Julius Caesar addressed to his soldiers prior to the conquest of Rome, after the famous crossing the river Rubicon in 49 BC. Among the most important buildings of Rimini are the Arch of Augustus and the Tiberius Bridge.

Marina with the unexplainable lonely skyscraper in the background

Town marina with the unexplainable lonely skyscraper in the background

Piazza Tre Martiti

Piazza Tre Martiti where Caesar had his speech

The Arch of Augustus, built 27 BC

The Arch of Augustus, built 27 BC

The Tiberius Bridge, built 21 AD

The Tiberius Bridge, built 21 AD

Fun fact for the movie lovers: Rimini is the birthplace of Frederico Fellini. He is one of the most influential directors and screenwriters from Europe. He won five Oscars, which made him the person that won the highest number of Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film in history.

Even though the beaches of Rimini are crowded and expensive, the Old Town is a great way to spend your evenings here. Located in the region of Emilia-Romagna, it is close to a lot of beautiful cities. You can take the bus or train to San Marino, Bologna, Ravenna, Urbino and many more. We had two excursions. One to San Marino, a 40 minute bus ride away, and the other to Bologna, an hour long trip by train. Both cities are amzing and we had a great time.

Sunset on the beach

Sunset on the beach

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3 thoughts on “Rimini: The invasion of parasols

    • I’m happy that you like our blog, that means a lot 🙂 thanks for stopping by and I hope that some day (hopefully soon) you come to Europe and enjoy it as much as you can 🙂

  1. Pingback: Bologna: Renaissance architecture with cars | 2 World Trippers

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